Applying "Balanced Focus" to your Lifestyle (Part 1)

Updated: Dec 15, 2020




How focused are you?


How focused are you?


Be honest.


When answering this question I want you to look at your (work) calendar for the past week(s) and reflect.


Do your activities and actions actually show focus toward one worthwhile objective?


Or are you spread thin doing lots of different activities, context switching all the time, and making therefore overall only mediocre progress on an important goal?


Quick reflection: On a scale from 1-10 (where 10 is extremely focused), rate yourself how focused you actually were. Don’t think too much, just look at the data, and decide.


How balanced are you?


Now let's look at other categories of your life (e.g., your health, family, relationships, fun activities). Would you say that you have achieved a good work-life balance in the past 7 days or the past month?


Quick reflection: On a scale from 1-10 (where 10 is extremely balanced), rate yourself how balanced you actually were. Don’t think too much, just look at the data, and decide.


When it comes to focus I hear people often talk about being "laser-focused" toward an objective. However, as you are aware, laser cuts and burns through material. So unless you want to ruin your health and neglect other important areas of your life, it is generally not helpful to apply this technique.


Balance is one of the most important universal principles in all aspects of life.

Balance is doing something in just the right amount or dosage. Not too much of it, but sufficient so that something can actually flourish. Think about watering a plant. If you water it too much it will die, but without sufficient water it will die as well.


When you now combine balance and focus in a systematic way, this can generate a very powerful impact to your life. Let’s find out how …



Your Taxonomy of Life Categories


There are different categories in your life that deserve attention. Several books about personal growth are suggesting categories of different aspects of your life.


To keep things simple, I suggest a simple taxonomy of categories of life that worke